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  • REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS:


    FINAL PENSION PAPERS

    The original records abstracted for these publications below belong to the Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury (Record Group 217). The National Archives description for this specific collection of Third Auditor records is "Entry 722: Selected Final Payment Vouchers, 1818-1864." The National Archives staff formed this collection by culling only the "settled accounts" or very last payments made by each pension office to each pensioner. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) describes this collection as follows, from a current hand-out given to researchers:
    "Final Pension Vouchers Revolutionary War"
    Recognizing the great genealogical value of the final pension vouchers and the difficulty in locating them among the pension agents' accounts, the National Archives located and removed these vouchers from the voluminous accounts of the pension agents, thus rendering them more accessible to researchers and the staff of the National Archives. This project, which took about five years to complete, resulted in the segregation of about 55,000 final or last payment vouchers and the creation of an index to these vouchers. The segregated vouchers are arranged by State and then alphabetically by name of pensioner; the index is alphabetical. The final payment is the record of the "final" payment paid to the heirs of a pensioner after his death. If the heirs did not file for the money that was due the pensioner from the time of the receipt of his last pension payment until the time of his death[,] there is no final payment, only a "last" payment. The removal of the final or last payment vouchers was a time-consuming and involved project, requiring thousands of staff-hours of work. From the registers of payments to United States pensioners (available on microfilm as T718), the name of every Revolutionary War veteran paid under the acts of 1818, 1828, and 1832 was placed on a 3 x 5 index card. The following information obtained from the registers was also included on the card: place where the pension agent was located, the act under which payment was made, date of death, and date either of the final or of the last payment. The date of the last payment to the pensioner was recorded only if there was no indication in the register that a final payment had been made to his heirs. The accounts of the appropriate pension agent were then searched. If the voucher was located, it was removed and placed in an acid-free envelope, the proper index card was then annotated with the asterisk (*) to indicate that the voucher had been located and withdrawn. The same procedures were followed for widows and invalid pensioners; only if the ledgers indicated that a final payment had been made after their death. No search was conducted for the last payment vouchers for these individuals. The Central Reference Staff of the National Archives will search the index cards and the segregated vouchers. If the requested voucher is not among these files, no further searching will be made except in the cases where the researcher has determined from the registers of payments (microfilm T718) that final payment was made. The researcher must provide the staff with the name of the pensioner, the location of the pension agency, the act under which he was paid, the date of death, and the date of the final payment. This information is available from the pension application files and the registers of payments. The Central Reference Staff will not search for last payment vouchers. Despite the title of this NARA hand-out, not all vouchers pertain to Revolutionary War pensioners. Others claim service in the War of 1812, Florida War, and Seminole War, or regular army service. Neither do these vouchers represent every pensioner paid by any given pension office. Further, the pension act of 6 April 1838 resulted in a collection of pension payment vouchers which were not handled by the various pension agencies but by the Treasury Department itself (RG 217, Entry 724). Those vouchers contain the very same types of information, but were neither culled nor indexed by the NARA staff in their above-described project. Last and final pension payment vouchers contain a variety of "extra" data, such as the maiden names of widows, and their full dates and places of marriage (sometimes supplied by attendees or the celebrant). One such marriage record in Louisiana among these vouchers was transcribed by the priest at St. Louis Cathedral, and gives the parentage of both bride and groom as well as the groom's birthplace. In another instance, a coroner's report confirms that a veteran drowned in Lake Pontchartrain when the steamboat he was riding burned to the water's edge. And, in a final example, a 32-year-old veteran's death was reported by his brother-in-law, who identified not only the exact time of death, but the place as well, right down to the French Quarter street location and the proprietor's name of the coffee house (suggesting that perhaps one can have one too many beignets).

    Last Payments
    Last pension payment records adhered to certain prescribed guidelines, containing certain elements fairly consistent among all such records. The prescribed formats to be used appear in the Appendix. First, the pensioner was required to furnish evidence of his or her pension; this typically resulted in a recitation of the veteran's rank, the date of the pension act under which he or she drew a pension, and usually a statement as to his or her present and former residences. Earlier final payment records often give much more specificity as to the pensioner's service, giving superior officers' names as well as the regiment in which he served, but less information as to former residences. From this section, the pensioner's rank and residence information, and his ability to sign his name were abstracted. Next, the pensioner gave power of attorney to someone to go to the pertinent pension office and collect his payment, specifying the beginning and ending dates of the payment period. Most of the persons so appointed resided in the pension office city, although less often a neighbor or kinsman was given power of attorney. The names of all persons given powers of attorney were abstracted, since these could be kinsmen or neighbors. Wherever a relationship between the pensioner and his attorney was stated, or the attorney's residence other than the pension office city was stated, these data were also abstracted. It should be assumed that all attorneys could sign their names unless their mark is noted. Such powers of attorney needed to be acknowledged before a local magistrate or witnessed by two witnesses. Witness or magistrate names were extracted. Local authorities then attested to the validity or terms of office for justices of the peace or magistrates who signed the pensioners' powers of attorney; none of this information is abstracted. Acting attorneys presented themselves before authorities local to them to sign a standard statement indicating that they understood they were to collect and return all monies collected to the pensioners. These signed statements were not abstracted. Finally, the pension office issued a dated receipt indicating how much money, and for what pensioner and payment period, was paid to the acting attorney, who signed the receipt. This information is abstracted.

    Final Payments
    In all cases, the final payments reflect payments made to the widow, children, or estate of deceased pensioners. The above progression of paperwork is similar, but many variations occurred. In the case of intestate pensioners, magistrates often certified the date and court at which administrators qualified. When a widow survived, she signed or marked a statement of her late husband's service, residence, and entitlement to a pension as well as the power of attorney. The local court usually certified the death date of the pensioner and the fact that he left a widow yet living. When children survived, their names and residences usually appear in the local court's certification. Indeed their various powers of attorney may reflect their remote or out-of-state residences, and the married names of pensioners' daughters. However, cases occur in which only the administrator appeared in the final payment documents, even though references are made to the fact that children do survive. Final payment papers include the pensioner's original or replacement pension claim papers which identify his service, the act under which he drew his pension, and the rate thereof. If the claim paper was lost or destroyed, a statement to that effect appears in its stead.

    Description of the Abstracts
    Numerous typographical errors occurred when jackets were prepared for these vouchers years ago. Since these are the spellings or misspellings under which the vouchers are presently arranged, the exact spelling used on the jacket appears in the header of each abstract here. Italics appear wherever spellings vary, seem illogical, or were illegible. All marks are noted. The local court's certification that someone was the bona fide executor or administrator of a pensioner (or survivor) was not abstracted unless it stated the court date at which the will was proved and/or the executor(s) or administrator(s) qualified to serve as such. Mixed use of present and past tense in these abstracts is intentional, to help differentiate between deceased pensioners and surviving heirs. For consistency's sake, the term "pensioner" is used even in cases where persons were eligible for pensions but had not actually applied for nor been granted pensions in their lifetime. Similarly, the term "arrears" is used in all cases of payments due to deceased pensioners, even though the original may state "balance" or "pension" or "monies." The flow of information abstracted may differ from its order of appearance in the actual voucher. Not every part of the voucher was signed on the same date or in the same place. The local court's certification often repeats information given by the pensioner or survivors and is therefore not abstracted unless the certification occurred in a place other than the first-stated locale. The date of the power of attorney and the date on which the payment was collected were abstracted. These abstracts are not intended as a substitute for the original vouchers. In all cases the original voucher should be consulted for the complete, verbatim record of the payment(s) made.

    VIRGINIA FINAL PENSION PAYMENTS, 1818-1864: RICHMOND & WHEELING compiled by Alycon Trubey Pierce. 1996, paper, 2 volumes, 788 pages, introduction, index.
    See description above.
    [Vfpp] $49.95 / 2 volume set

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    LOUISIANA FINAL PENSION PAYMENTS, 1818-1864 compiled by Alycon Trubey Pierce. 1996, paper, 39 pages, introduction, index.
    See description above.
    [lapp] $9.95
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    MISSISSIPPI FINAL PENSION PAYMENTS, 1818-1864 compiled by Alycon Trubey Pierce. 1996, paper, 51 pages, introduction, index.
    See description above.
    [mspp] $9.95
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    SOUTH CAROLINA FINAL PENSION PAYMENTS, 1818-1864 compiled by Alycon Trubey Pierce. 1996, paper, 305 pages, introduction, index.
    See description above.
    [scpp] $25.95
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    REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS:

    ANOTHER VISIT TO VALLEY FORGE by Arthur E. Chapman. 2003, paper, 127 pages, introduction.
    In the American Revolution, five incidents stand out as defining moments. These are the decision to declare independence from Britain, Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga, the attack on Trenton and Princeton, Cornwallis' defeat at Yorktown, and the Valley Forge Encampment. Of the five, it is the Valley Forge Encampment — the men and women who were there — that created the first true American army. The army formed by the Encampment became the primary safeguard of our nation throughout the years to come and it is the focus of this study.
    TABLE OF CONTENTS
    PROLOGUE
    CHAPTER I The Road to Valley Forge
    CHAPTER II Endured Suffering
    CHAPTER III Housing and Shelter
    CHAPTER IV Subsistence, Food, and Drink
    CHAPTER V Clothing
    CHAPTER VI Causes of Shortages
    CHAPTER VII Special Units - The Life Guards
    CHAPTER VIII Medical Care
    CHAPTER IX The Defenses
    CHAPTER X Organization, Training, and Weapons
    CHAPTER XI Punishments and Crime
    CHAPTER XII Conclusions
    Appendix A The Search for the Encampment Site
    Appendix B. Duportail and Engineers
    Appendix C. George Washington's Christmas Eggnog
    Appendix D. Regimental Manning Levels
    Appendix E. Units
    [vfor] $9.95

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    VIRGINIA REVOLUTIONARY "PUBLICK" CLAIMS

          As Continental forces and Virginia militia units were engaged in winning independence, American quartermasters and provisioners struggled to provide these units with all the necessities of life, from meals and guns to meat, fodder for horses, the horses themselves, firewood, and every other type of material. Much of this was requisitioned from the civilian population and certificates were issued payable in either continental or state funds, depending on the units supplied, upon presentation to court authorities. Thousands of these certificates issued to Virginians were duly entered by the courts, and they provide a fascinating insight into the period of the Revolution. These "Publick" Claims booklets contain interesting and useful information about the contributions of ordinary people to the Revolutionary War. They provide some details of people's service in the militia or as guards for prisoners of war; they indicate where some bodies of troops were at particular times; and they identify providers of horses, wagons, cattle, grain, or other supplies. Much of the information in these booklets cannot be found anywhere else, which makes the surviving records particularly valuable. Also remarkable is the fact that records survived from virtually every county in the state at that time with the exception of the newly formed Kentucky counties. This makes the collection even more valuable in covering areas which heretofore in this time period have suffered from a lack of personal data. The "Virginia Publick Claims" are published by counties. In addition to a faithful transcription by Janice Luck Abercrombie and the late Richard Slatten, a complete index is provided for each county booklet. This series is an extremely important genealogical tool for searchers in Revolutionary-era materials.

    A 271-page Index to the Revolutionary "Publick" Claims is also available [Pcix] $22.50

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    INDIVIDUAL COUNTY BOOKLETS:
    • [Pc01] Accomack Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (6 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc02] Albemarle Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (70 pp.) $8.75
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    • [Pc03] Amelia Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (107 pp.) $14.00
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    • [Pc04] Amherst Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (50 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc05] Augusta Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (38 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc06] Bedford Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (64 pp.) $7.75
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    • [Pc07] Berkeley Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (30 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc08] Botetourt Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (49 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc09] Brunswick Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (58 pp.) $7.50
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    • [Pc10] Buckingham Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (37 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc11] Campbell Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (28 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc12] Caroline Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (100 pp.) $13.00
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    • [Pc13] Charles City Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (30 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc14] Charlotte Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (33 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc15] Chesterfield Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (57 pp.) $7.50
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    • [Pc16] Culpeper Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (82 pp.) $11.00
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    • [Pc17] Cumberland Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (71 pp.) $8.75
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    • [Pc18] Dinwiddie Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (51 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc19] Elizabeth City Co. "Publick" Claims (17 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc20] Essex Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (31 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc21] Fairfax Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (23 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc22] Fauquier Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (49 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc23] Fluvanna Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (34 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc24] Frederick Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (45 pp.) $6.25
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    • [Pc25] Gloucester Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (35 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc26] Goochland Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (52 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc27] Greenbrier Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (20 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc28] Greensville Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (21 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc29] Halifax Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (61 pp.) $7.75
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    • [Pc30] Hampshire Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (37 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc31] Hanover Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (116 pp.) $14.50
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    • [Pc32] Henrico Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (23 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc33] Henry Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (53 pp.) $7.25
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    • [Pc34] Isle of Wight Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (33 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc35] James City Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (26 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc36] King & Queen Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (66 pp.) $8.25
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    • [Pc37] King George Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (27 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc38] King William Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (58 pp.) $7.50
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    • [Pc39] Lancaster Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (30 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc40] Loudoun Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (64 pp.) $7.75
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    • [Pc41] Louisa Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (73 pp.) $7.75
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    • [Pc42] Lunenburg Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (27 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc43] Mecklenburg Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (65 pp.) $7.75
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    • [Pc44] Middlesex Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (14 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc45] Monongalia Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (16 pp. $5.00
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    • [Pc46] Montgomery Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (21 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc47] Nansemond Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (50 pp.) $6.75
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    • [Pc48] New Kent Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (31 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc49] Norfolk Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (33 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc50] Northampton Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (11 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc51] Northumberland Co. "Publick" Claims (22 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc52] Orange Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (68 pp.) $8.25
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    • [Pc53] Pittsylvania Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (43 pp.) $6.25
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    • [Pc54] Powhatan Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (40 pp.) $6.00
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    • [Pc55] Prince Edward Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (43 pp.) $6.25
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    • [Pc56] Prince George Co. Va. "Publick" Claims (18 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc70] Prince William Co. Va. "Publick" Claims (20 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc57] Princess Anne Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (20 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc58] Richmond Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (20 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc59] Rockbridge Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (24 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc60] Rockingham Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (45 pp.) $6.25
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    • [Pc61] Shenandoah Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (26 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc62] Southampton Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (25 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc63] Spotsylvania Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (52 pp.) $7.25
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    • [Pc64] Stafford Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (45 pp.) $6.25
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    • [Pc65] Surry Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (19 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc66] Sussex Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (28 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc67] Warwick Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (13 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc68] Westmoreland Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (21 pp.) $5.00
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    • [Pc69] York Co., Va. "Publick" Claims (27 pp.) $5.00
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    VIRGINIA REVOLUTIONARY "PUBLICK" CLAIMS now available in a deluxe library binding 1131 pages, 3 volume set. The entire set of seventy county booklets listed above, in three volumes, with a single comprehensive index at the end of volume 3. Purchased separately, the county booklets would cost ca. $450. The hard-bound version, printed on high quality, acid-free in a durable and attractive library binding with gold leaf. [VPC3] $200.00 *****TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE*****


    VIRGINIA REVOLUTIONARY WAR LAND GRANT CLAIMS, 1783-1850 (REJECTED) compiled by William Lindsay Hopkins. 1988, iv, 293 pages, index. 6x9 format. Abstracted from materials in the Virginia State Library, Richmond, these records often contain information about the veteran, his descendants and other affidavits from other living veterans who may never have asked for pensions or Bounty land in their own right. The book concerns the applications made for bounty land after the war which was rejected usually because the veteran had not served the requisite time or documents were missing to prove he had ever served at all. [Vgcr] $35.00

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    GEORGIA REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS AND SAILORS, PATRIOTS AND PIONEERS compiled by H. Ross Arnold and Hank Burnham. 2001, viii, 803 pages, 2 volumes. index. Originally published as Georgia Revolutionary War Soldiers' Graves [1993], this work has been significantly upgraded in the past decade to reflect new grave sites, as well as the losses incurred by the French soldiers in the siege of Savannah.
    One of the most significant publications of Georgia Revolutionary records in recent decades! While the title appears not to fit within the purview of Virginia genealogical research, it is important to note that of the 3,500 soldiers' graves and military records noted in this work, fully one-fifth, or more than six hundred veterans came from Virginia!!! They came to Georgia by the thousands following the Revolution, out of Virginia and the Carolinas--veterans following the new lands opening up in the land lotteries of Georgia. Whether drawn by land or the lure of the new frontier or the burgeoning cotton industry, these veterans eventually settled in Georgia and began families whose descendants continue in the area to this day. This massive work has been long in coming.
    [Grpp] (2 volume set, paperback) $49.95

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    POST-REVOLUTIONARY RECORDS (1783-1860):

    LOUDOUN COUNTY MILITIA REGISTERS, 1793-1829 by Don Blincoe, Sr. 1993, ix, 495 pages (8½x11), indices. A careful and exact transcription of the militia registers for this most important county. Contains over 20,000 references to men who served during this period. Extremely valuable, since every able-bodied male over sixteen years was liable for service unless exempted by age or infirmity. Also important for families who moved away, since often in the registers it notes their destinations. The Loudoun County militia journals list the names of hundreds of men who lived there from 1793 until 1824. There are company rosters naming the officers, sergeants, corporals, drummers and clerks. Officers of higher rank and assignment are frequently mentioned. One can also find the names and locations of home and tavern owners who provided space for companies to muster and rooms for boards to convene in. Although there is little family information, some militiamen are further identified by the listing of their fathers' or masters' names beside their own. There are many rosters which include father and son or several brothers, all in the same companies.
    [Lomp] $39.95

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    VIRGINIA SOLDIERS IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY, 1800-1815 compiled by Stuart Lee Butler. 1986, paper, 188 pages, introduction, index. This volume contains the abstracted service records of 5,193 Virginians who enlisted in the regular United States army during the period 1800-1815. Material is taken from the Register of Enlistments now in the custody of the National Archives. The list contains, wherever possible: full name; unit to which he was assigned; occupation prior to enlistment; county of birth; age; place and date of enlistment, and status at the end of his term of services (i.e., date and place of discharge, desertion, death, or other record. This book will become a major reference tool for genealogists in this period of Virginia history. Many of the pioneer families in the mid-west were descended from these cashiered soldiers at the end of the war.
    [Vsus] $17.00

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    A GUIDE TO VIRGINIA MILITIA UNITS IN THE WAR OF 1812 Stuart Lee Butler, second edition, revised and expanded. 8 x 10,

    2011, xvi, 270 pages, index, maps, photos. When this volume first was published in 1988, it quickly became a definitive study on the role played by the Virginia militia in defense of both the state and the nation in the Anglo-British conflict. The author of the volume spent his career with the National Archives and Records Administration in the Old military and Civil Branch Records, where he specialized in early American military records. Since his retirement, Mr. Butler has continued his research in the area of the War of 1812, and with the upcoming bicentennial of the conflict, the product of this expanded research is presented in this new work. The primary sources of information for this enlarged volume are found among the massive holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC. In addition, materials have been drawn from numerous other state and local archival collections to present a balanced, scholarly account of the Virginia militia and its role in this war. This book is as complete a guide to the militia units raised in Virginia as records permit. The book is divided into three parts: Part I describes the organization of the Virginia militia, i.e., its regiments, battalions, and companies, and explains in what manner it was to be called up during an emergency. Part II frames an expanded history of the role played by the Virginia militia during this conflict. Part III, the largest portion, is a county-by-county listing of the units, with the naming of the regimental commanders, company commanders, and the known action and movements of the unit during the war. The book includes the name of the company or unit commander, not every soldier who served within that unit. Researchers who have secured copies of CMSRs [compiled military service records] from the National Archives or other sources will be able to determine the unit in which a soldier served, where and when that unit operated, and, in most instances, ascertain the soldier's county of origin. A complete index of unit commanders completes this standard reference work. What is presented here is a distillation of a life's research by the premier scholar in the field of the War of 1812.
    [Gtvm2] $30.00

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    CIVIL WAR RECORDS:

    SAVE ME ONE APPLE: THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF CAPT. HENRY ROACH (1834-1863), CO. K, 21ST VIRGINIA INFANTRY, CSA by Karen Wagner Treacy. 2012, Paper, 8x10, iv, 147 pp.
    Among the thousands of soldiers milling around Virginia in 1861 was a private named Henry Roach. Henry was 27 years old when he enlisted on 21 May 1861 in Meherrin, Prince Edward County VA. The “Meherrin Greys” became Company K of the 21st Virginia Infantry. He advanced to sergeant 12 November 1861, to lieutenant 21 April 1862, and to captain 20 April 1863. He fought in many of the battles of the Virginia campaigns, including Kernstown, Cedar Mountain, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He was wounded slightly at Chancellorsville, and killed in a skirmish 26 October 1863 near Brandy Station, in the Mine Run campaign. Through the lens of his letters and other surviving documents, we are brought behind the eyes and into the feelings of the many, many soldiers he typifies.
    He wrote these letters to Sue Browning, of Appomattox. She was his cousin, and in the course of their correspondence they become engaged. What we know directly of Henry comes from the 51 letters Sue saved for the rest of her life. In 1868 Sue married Samuel Harvey, who had served in the 18th Virginia Infantry Co H (Henry Roach’s brothers Billy and Elijah served in Co K of the 18th). After the war the Harveys moved to western Virginia with other members of the extended Browning family. Samuel died in 1921, and Sue some time before 1930. .....
    Henry was never faced with surrender, but the course of his letters show him reluctantly becoming aware of the ultimate futility of the cause. The fall of the South overturned not just a physical world. The soldiers who survived had to come to terms with the failure of an order which all their faith and moral certainty told them must triumph. Henry looked beyond the fate of his own company to the greater meaning of events. His faith faltered at times but he steadied it, he grew to be ‘if not a Christian, a better man.’ Henry’s tragedy, like that of so many soldiers in so many wars, was that he had so little time to make use of the lessons he learned.....
    Indeed, Henry is a valuable resource for examining the common pool of imagery. What might at first glance be taken for one man’s attempt at poetic expression, when compared to other soldiers’ use of the same idiom and image, shows how people of his time and place agreed to express these common ideas. Henry’s letters serve as a check mechanism for which motifs were unique to a given soldier and which were part of the common lot, the common formula. A later section of this work compares statements in Henry’s correspondence to similar strains in other soldiers’ writings, to show how the time and the culture agreed to express various thoughts. Henry is a palatable type example of the ordinary Virginian soldier. We are by him as he was by whiskey: he was not hard to take.
    [SMOA] $24.95

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    VIRGINIA'S FOREIGN BORN CONFEDERATES by Thomas W. Spratt. 2011, Paper, 8x10, xiv, 299 pp.
    This publication resulted from the current interest in the "War" and the increasing interest exhibited by people to trace their ancestry. It is the author's sincere desire that this publication will assist those people in their searches.
    Many immigrants came to America during a time between their birth and the beginning of the Civil War. Many of these enlisted in Virginia regiments in early 1861. The number who enlisted is amazing because after a year's service, many were discharged due to the fact that they were considered non-residents of the Confederacy. The information in this publication, while scarce in many cases, is based on their service records. A number of these foreign born Confederates were born in Ireland who believed if they stayed in Ireland faced more poverty, disease, starvation and English oppresion. And finally, the Irish diet was mainly potatoes that often grew on poor land. However, in 1845 a potato blight overtook the fields of Ireland and crop failures continued until 1852 causing many Irish to immigrate. It also should be noted that, in some cases, it appears the soldiers names have been anglicized in their service records. Finally, those who use a sound index when searching other records, should search for variants of surnames. A fine example of this is the Zirkle name. It can be found in the records as Cirkle, Zircle, Zirkel, Zercle, Zerkle, Zerkel and Circle.
    The records in this publication may be incomplete in some cases. It is not the intention of the author to purposefully omit any man who served in the Confederacy. It, however, is the authors belief that most of the men have been included in this publication.
    [VFBC] $29.95

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    THE 11th VIRGINIA INFANTRY: A REGIMENTAL HISTORY; VOL. 1: THE ROSTER by Jerald H. Markham. 2011. Paperback, 8x10, xii, 407 pp, illustrations, maps, color photos. The following pages of this roster includes the individual history of each of the men, the citizen soldier, that served in the 11th Virginia Volunteer Infantry. Great pains have been taken and every possible effort has been made to tell the story of these men within the following pages. Some of the materials used in compiling this roster; Confederate Complied Service Records (Microfilm #M324, roll #0498 through #0512 - 15 rolls of microfilm), current rosters and histories, post-war rosters and histories, pension records, family genealogies, education records, cemetery records, and numerous newspaper accounts, both contemporary and post-war. The author’s other work on the Civil War period includes Confederate Veterans Buried in Hollywood Cemetery from Camp Lee Soldiers Home, 1894 - 1946 and The Botetourt Artillery.
    [VA11] $34.95

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    THE 47th VIRGINIA INFANTRY by Homer D. Musselman. 2nd edition, 2010. Paperback, 6x9, x, 228 pp, illustrations, maps, color photos. This definitive study of the 47th Va. Infantry was first published in 1991, and today copies of the original volume are on the used book market for more than two hundred dollars. The author has continued his research into the unit's history and has significantly expanded the original, especially in the unit roster. Like its predecessor, this work is destined to become the definitive study on this element of Civil War history.
    [47VA] $24.95

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    THE BOTETOURT ARTILLERY by Jerald H. Markham. 2nd edition, 2010. Paperback, 6x9, x, 201 pp. Since the first publication (1995) of Markham's book, his study of this important Confederate unit has become a classic. Current used copies of his original 95-page work sell on the used book market for anywhere from $60 to $150. The author has continued his research and has produced a second edition, expanding the original study by more than a hundred pages with the inclusion of additional photos and an extensive roster of all known members of the unit. Like its predecessor, this work is destined to become the definitive study on this portion of Civil War history.
    [Bota] $24.95

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    Introducing the MEN IN GRAY INTERMENTS (Virginia Series) by Thomas M. Spratt

          These book descriptions have become too large to include on this page. Click on the link below to browse the Virginia cemeteries covered in this series.   There are hundreds of cemeteries from all over Virginia.   These books include gravestone inscriptions for both Confederate soldiers killed in action and veterans who died later.   The author endeavors to document every Confederate soldier interred in Virginia in this comprehensive series. In all, 20 volumes in this series have been published
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    Introducing the MEN IN GRAY INTERMENTS (American Series) by Thomas M. Spratt

    Click on the link below to browse the cemeteries outside the state of Virginia which have been determined to include Virginia veterans or casualties of the Civil War. These books include gravestone inscriptions for both Confederate soldiers killed in action and veterans who died later.   The author endeavors to document every Confederate soldier interred in this comprehensive series. The series is now complete in four volumes.
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    Introducing the VIRGINIA'S CIVIL WAR CASUALTIES: A ROSTER by Thomas M. Spratt

    Click on the link below to browse the roster of all the casualties incurred by the men in Virginia regiments during the Civil War. This work is organized by infantry, artillery, cavalry and other units in the Confederate forces. Types of casualties include: Killed in Action; Died of Wounds; Died of Disease; Miscellaneous Deaths; and No Cause of Death Listed. The set is now complete in a total of six volumes
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    PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT COLLECTION OF CONFEDERATE RECORDS (RECORD GROUP 109) IN THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES compiled by Elizabeth Bethel. 1957 (reprinted 1981, 1994). Now indexed by Craig R. Scott. 8½x11 300 pp. For the first time, this landmark reference has been retypeset into a more usable form, and provided with an index and microfilm listings. This volume is the treasure trove from which sources for most Confederate records are extracted. Most significant records of the Confederate government reside in Washington, DC where they are part of Record Group 109 in the National Archives.
    [Conf] $33.00

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    BROTHERS AND COUSINS: CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS & SAILORS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA by William Page Johnson II. xviii, 249 pages, photos, index. This book attempts to record all the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors of Fairfax County. Included herein are men who were born in Fairfax County and resided there (before and/or after the war). Also included are those who died there (during and after the war) and those who are buried there. The material is presented in alphabetical order by soldier/sailor name.
    [Brot] $22.50

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    FREDERICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA MEN IN GRAY compiled by Thomas M. Spratt. 2008, 223 pages, index. A continuation of the same series as "Shenandoah County Men in Gray" (see Frederick County page for details). [Frmg] $29.95

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    SHENANDOAH COUNTY, VIRGINIA MEN IN GRAY compiled by Thomas M. Spratt. 2 volumes, 1992, xix, 902 pages, index. This massive undertaking not only reproduces the service record of the Confederate soldiers from Shenandoah County who served in all the theaters of combat, but it also gives extremely valuable information regarding the soldier's family. whenever possible, the author has searched out birth and death dates, as well as places when known; the wife's name and her vital statistics; parents' names; children, and their spouses, and a wealth of other miscellaneous information. Several appendices contain the soldiers' names with their unit designations for quick reference; soldiers buried in the county; a listing of county cemeteries with finding directions; and an extensive bibliography.
    [Scmg] $49.95

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    PAGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA MEN IN GRAY compiled by Thomas M. Spratt. 1994, ca. 400 pages, index. A continuation of the same series as "Shenandoah County Men in Gray" (see Shenandoah county above for details). [Pcmg] $27.95

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    ROCKINGHAM CO., VA MEN IN GRAY compiled by Thomas M. Spratt. 2 volumes, 1995, xix, 615 pages, index. This massive undertaking not only reproduces the service record of the nearly two thousand Confederate soldiers from Rockingham County who served in all the theaters of combat, but it also gives extremely valuable information regarding the soldier's family. whenever possible, the author has searched out birth and death dates, as well as places when known; the wife's name and her vital statistics; parents' names; children, and their spouses, and a wealth of other miscellaneous information. Several appendices contain the soldiers' names with their unit designations for quick reference; and an extensive bibliography. Persons with relations in Rockingham will find this a treasure trove of information. This is the third volume in the Valley of Virginia Confederate Series by this author; see also Shenandoah and Page Counties.
    [Rkmg] 2 vol. set $39.95

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    General Henry Lewis Benning This Was A Man: A Biography of Georgia's Supreme Court Justice and Confederate General by J. David Dameron
    This biography is the premier and definitive story of Georgia's stalwart judge, statesman, and military commander. Affectionately known as "Old Rock," General Henry Lewis Benning led his brigade of dogged Southern warriors to numerous victories against overwhelming odds. Their achievements at the defense of Burnside's Bridge, the capture of the Devil's Den, and many other victories legendary in the annals of the American Civil War. Yet little has been written about the man who led them. His story delves deeply into political affairs, court cases, and the societal woes that he and his peers were forced to address. Through the words and deeds of Henry Benning, explore the impact of religion, slavery, and the critical roles these institutions played in antebellum society. As his story unfolds, the reader will learn how Benning's background and experiences shaped him into one of the most admired men of the South.

    Set in the tumultuous era, Benning's story is filled with real-life drama. His personal triumphs and tragedies as well as the important events of his day are supported by bountiful resources for further investigation. Original maps, charts and rare photographs enhance the narrative, which is also supported with detailed chapter notes, references and little-known facts. For example, discover why Margaret Mitchell used Benning's Beautiful wife as a character model for her bestseller, Gone with the Wind. Examine how Benning surpassed his classmates Howell Cobb and Herschell V. Johnson (Georgia governors) and became Valedictorian of his class at Franklin College (now the University of Georgia). Find out why Henry Benning was so respected in Columbus, Georgia that his fellow citizens recorded, "No man in this city is loved like he." Upon his death, Benning was sincerely mourned by the affluent, the poor, and even his former slaves. Moreover, discover for yourself why Benning's friends and family recorded on his tomb, General Henry Lewis Benning, "This Was a Man!"

    5 ¼" x 8 ¼" format, 438 pages, color cover, 92 internal illustrations, bibliography, comprehensive index, maps, charts, graphs. Paperback.
    [Ghlb] $29.95

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    Confederate Property & Materiel Suppliers in Virginia, 1861-1865 by Thomas M. Spratt. The author continues his voluminous works on Confederate Virginia in this listing of all known property held by the Confederate government, from office space to training camps. The listing also includes the names of major suppliers of war materiel to the government. The list is arranged by county/city. 5 ¼" x 8 ¼" format, 49 pages, color cover, bibliography. Paperback.
    [Cpms] $10.95

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    SEE ALSO: THE TRUE STORY OF ANDERSONVILLE PRISON by James Madison Page in collaboration with M. J. Haley (original edition published in 1908).



    TWENTIETH CENTURY MILITARY RECORDS:


    ROCKINGHAM COUNTY IN THE WORLD WAR, 1917-1918 1931, Published by the Rockingham Post No. 27, The American Legion (Harrisonburg, Va.). (reprinted 1993). 128 pages, figure, 2 photos, index. This is a complete study of the 1,226 veterans who were officially credited with active service in the Great War both abroad or at home. Included is information about units of service, brief biographies of those killed in action, and notes on awards given to Rockingham soldiers. This most thorough work will prove handy for genealogists. [Rww1] $9.95

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