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Greenbrier County Virginia


Map of Va: Greenbrier CountyThe new county was named for the Greenbrier River, a prominent water feature of the region. The first settlement in the region was made at Frankfort in 1769. shortly thereafter, in 1777, Greenbrier County was formed from the western parts of Botetourt and Montgomery counties. At the time, the new counties encompassed the entire central region of present-day West Virginia. In 1790 part of Bath County and in 1799 all of Monroe County was cut off from Greenbrier lands. Also from Greenbrier came part of Nicholas County (1818), part of Pocahontas County (1825 & 1827), part of Fayette County (1831), part of Webster (1863 & 1882), and Summers County (1871). Portions of the Monroe cessions were returned to Greenbrier in 1825 and 1827, and part of the Fayette cession was returned in 1833.

For a better understanding of county boundary changes, see our new section Virginia in Maps
GREENBRIER COUNTY, VA 1810 SUBSTITUTE CENSUS [Abstracts from the 1810 Personal Property Tax List] by John Vogt, 2011, 5 1/2"x 8 1/2" format, vi, 14 pages, map.
        Greenbrier is one of eighteen Virginia counties for which the 1810 census is lost. In August, 1814 British troops occupied Washington, DC and public buildings were put to the torch. In the destruction that followed, numerous early records of the government were lost, including all of Virginia’s 1790 and 1800 census reports, as well as eighteen county lists for the state's most recent [1810] federal census. Although two “fair copies” of each county’s census had been left in the counties for public display, these were ephemeral lists and not preserved, and by 1814 they too had been mislaid, lost, or destroyed. Hence, the closest document available we have to reconstruct a partial image of the missing county lists is the personal property tax list.
       According to research notes by Minor T. Weisiger, Library of Virginia archivist: “Information recorded in Virginia personal property tax records changed gradually from 1782 to 1865. The early laws required the tax commissioner in each district to record in “a fair alphabetical list” the names of the person chargeable with the tax, the names of white male tithables over the age of twenty-one, the number of white male tithables between ages sixteen and twenty-one, the number of slaves both above and below age sixteen, various types of animals such as horses and cattle, carriage wheels, ordinary licenses, and even billiard tables. Free Negroes are listed by name and often denoted in the list as “free” or “FN.”
       The present abstract of Greenbrier's 1810 personal property tax list is NOT a transcript of the entire document; rather, it is a summary of three items important in delineating the 1810 "substitute" census for this county, i.e., number of male tithables 16 and older, number of slaves twelve years and older, and the number of horses. The original form of the census was in alphabetic order by date and letter. The substitute list presented here is in absolute alphabetic order for easy reference.

In the current volume, the data is recorded thus:
        Kincaid, Samuel J.r           -        -        5
        Kincaid, Samuel S.r        3        5        11
        Kincaid, Samuel
            (blacksmith)                1        -        -
        Column one represents the tithable males (16 and over) in the household; column 2 is the number of slaves over 12; and the final column is the number of horses, mares or mules.
        For genealogical researchers in this 1810 period, personal property tax records may provide additional important information. Oftentimes, juniors and seniors are listed adjacent to one another and recorded on the same day. When a taxpayer is noted as “exempt”, it can be a clue to someone holding a particular position in government or being elderly, infirm, or for some other reason no longer required to pay the tithable tax. Women, both black and white, appear occasionally as heads of households when they own property in their own right or as the widow of a property owner.
        Another valuable source for filling in information about an ancestor is the land tax record, and especially the one for 1815. In that year, the enumerators began to add the location of the property in relation to the county court house. Roger Ward has abstracted all of the 1815 land tax records, and they are available from this publisher at www.iberian.com.
        The 1810 substitute census list for Greenbrier County contains 1,041 households, 1,219 tithables, both white and free black, and 283 slaves over the age of twelve, and 3,520 horses.

SURNAMES included in the 1810 personal property list are:
          Acres; Adkins; Adwell; Alderson; Allen; Anderson; Andrick; Arbaugh; Arbuckle; Argabright; Armstrong; Arnold; Arwin; Ary; Athell; Atkison; Augustus;

          Bailey; Baker; Baly; Barret; Basenger; Baze; Beam; Beard; Beazley; Bedford; Bennet; Benston; Bevins; Bird; Black; Blair; Blake; Blaze; Boggs; Boman; Borders; Bowen; Bowger; Boyer; Brag; Brammer; Brand; Brannum; Brawley; Bray; Breeding; Brian; Bright; Brinkly; Brit; Brown; Bruffey; Buchhannon; Bulman; Bunger; Burdit; Burgess; Burnes; Burr; Busby; Butcher; Butler; Butt; Byer; Byers;

          Cahaan; Cales; Camp; Campbell; Canens; Caperton; Carman; Carnes; Carpenter; Carr; Carrel; Carrens; Carrick; Carriway; Cart; Cary; Casebolt; Castle; Cate; Caul; Cavendish; Cesler; Chapman; Childers; Chipen; Church; Claypole; Cline; Clingman; Coalter; Cockburn; Coffman; Coggen; Cole; Collison; Colly; Comer; Comes; Commer; Conner; Cook; Coonrod; Cooper; Copenhaver; Correll; Corrl; Cotten; Cottle; Cox; Crafford; Craig; Crawfort; Cresimore; Crist; Crugh; Crunibow; Current; Curry; Cutlip; Cyler;

          Dalton; Daring; Daugherty; Davis; Deats ; Deckert; Deem; Deppow; Depres; Derieux; Dickson; Die; Diven; Dixon; Dodson; Dolton; Donalson; Donnally; Dorman; Dossey; Dossy; Dozer; Dunkin; Dunn; Dyche; Dyer; Dykes;

          Eads; Eagle; Eblin; Edgar; Edgars ; Elliot; Ellis; Emmit; Erwin; Eversolt; Evins;

          Fare; Fauckler; Feamster; Fifer; Fishback; Fisher; Fitzaters ; Flemmer; Fleshman; Flin; Flinn; Floyd; Foglesong; Ford; Forth; Fox; Frazer; Frier; Frisby; Fulwider;

          Gabbart; Gaut; George; Gibson; Gilkerson; Gilkison; Gillelan; Gillilan; Goshen; Grattan; Green; Gregory; Griffiths; Griffy; Griphy; Grisby; Guinn; Gwin; Gwinn;

          Haidenstone; Hambrick; Hammilton; Handley; Hanger; Hanna; Hanna; Hapinstall; Haptonstall; Harfford; Harler; Harman; Harpole; Harris; Harrow; Hartinger; Hause; Hauver; Hawl; Hayse; Heart; Hedrick; Heester ; Hendrick; Hendricks; Henning; Hibs; Hickman; Hicks; Hill; Hinckle; Hisey; Hobble; Holly; Holsobble; Holsoble; Holsopel; Holterman; Holton; Hoover; Hopper; Houchman; House; Hudgeons; Huet; Huff; Huffman; Hugans; Hugart; Huggart; Hughs; Hume; Hume; Humphreys; Hunter; Hutcheson; Hutsapellar ; Hyde;

          Ingle; Ingram; Irwin;

          James; Jamison; Janet; Jefferes; Jefferis; Johnson; Johnston; Jones; Jourdan; Judy;

          Keenan; Keeny; Kelly; Kenny; Kesler; Kid; Kidwell; Kincaid; Kippers; Kippers; Kirkpatrick; Kiser; Knap; Kyer; Kyle;

          Lamb; Landers; Lark; Lavicy; Lawson; Leftrage; Legg; Levesy; Lewis; Ligins; Ling; Linson; Lipps; Lips; Littlepage; Lockrige; Long; Longenaker; Longinaker; Lowans; Lowdermilk; Luddington; Lusher;

          Macket; Malone; Martin; Marton; Masters; Masterson; Matheny; Mathews; Matthews; Mays; Maze; McClehany; McClery; McClintick; McClintock; McClung; McClure; McCoy; McCray; McCutchen; McDowel; McFarren; McGraw; McLaughlin; McMilliam; McMillian; McNeal; McVay; Meek; Merriday; Merrow; Messick; Metzker; Miles; Miller; Mims; Miseley; MoConal; Mold; Monical; Moore; Moorhead; Morrison; Mosbargar; Mowery; Murphy; Myers;

          Neal; Neavins; Nelson; Newsom; Newton; Nicely; Nicholas; Nickall; Night; Nowell;

          Oakeltree; Oakletree; Ochaltree; Ocheltree; Odare; Odle; Osborn; Osburn; Ott; Otthare;

          Paign; Parker; Pasinger; Paterson; Pattan; Patton; Pearsy; Pees; Pence; Pennel; Peoples; Perkins; Perrell; Perry; Pery; Peters; Pettijohn; Phillips; Plod; Plumly; Pointer; Pope; Prian; Price; Propes; Prose;

          Rader; Rambo; Ramley; Rapp; Ray; Rea; Reid; Renick; Rickman; Rider; Riding; Rife; Riley; Riph; Robins; Robison; Rodes; Rodgers; Roe; Rogan; Royland; Rucker; Ruggles; Rukestool; Rumley; Runner; Ruple; Rutherford;

          Sammons; Sands; Scott; Shanklin; Shanks; Shaver; Shephard; Shery; Sheves; Shirey; Shivertaken; Shough; Shular; Sidensticker; Sidenstricker; Simarmon; Sinamon; Sirkle; Slater; Smith; Snedegar; Snell; Spencer; Spenser; Spotts; Stevens; Stevenson; Still; Stricklin; Stuart; Stumbough; Suiter; Suliven; Sulser; Surbough; Sutten; Suttle;

          Taylor; Terry; Teuwillow; Thompson; Tigar; Tinsher; Toler; Tompson; Toughman; Townsend; Trimbel; Tuewillow; Tyry;

          Underwood;

          Vachub; Vanarsdale; Vanasdal; Vance; Vandal; Vaun; Viny;

          Wade; Walker; Walkhob; Walkob; Wallace; Walton; Watchub; Watts; Weads; Weiford; Welch; Weslake; Westfall; Whanger; Wheeler; White; Whitman; Whitsol; Wiet; Wiley; Williams; Wilson; Winall; Wise; Witherhead; Witherow; Wolf; Wolfenbarger; Woltz; Wooden; Woods; Woodyard; Wossan;

          Yeager; Young;
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GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 1: Early Survey Records, 1780-1799; Early Court Minutes, 1780-1801 [1811]; Magistrate's Memoranda, 1817-1819; Court Record Books, 1828-1835; District Court Records, 1792-1797; Deeds, Sweet Springs Courthouse, 1789-1808 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 1988, viii, 457 pages, 3 maps. When Greenbrier County was established in 1778, it contained within its initial borders land that eventually would form another eleven counties in what later became the state of West Virginia. Sooner or later, any serious search in the southern West Virginia area leads back to Greenbrier County records. A most thorough index is provided in the current work, and it includes more than eight thousand unique entries for a total of about twenty-five thousand total references.
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[Grn1] $32.00


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 2: Personal property tax lists: 1782/83, 1786/88, 1792, 1796, 1799, 1805, 1815 transcribed by Larry Shuck 1989, ix, 302 p. The author continues with the compiling of Greenbrier's early records by the transcribing of selected personal property tax lists for this county until the time when surviving censuses are available to continue the search for ancestors. In the years when a date of visitation is included (1792, 1796, & 1799) two lists are available: one is presented in its entirety in alphabetic order, the second in abbreviated fashion by date of visitation. In this way the researcher can provide helpful clues as to who an ancestor's neighbors were.
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[Grn2] $27.00


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 3: U.S. Federal Population Schedules: 1820; 1830; 1840; & 1850 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 1990, xii, 421 pages. A household-by-household transcription of four early censuses is provided with a 71-page, triple-columned integrated index for the complete volume. Statistical analyses of the data is provided in the introduction.
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[Grn3] $24.50


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 4: Marriages of Greenbrier County, [W.] Virginia, 1782-1900 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 3 volumes, 1991, xii, 997 pages. This volume is a thorough and comprehensive listing and abstracting of data from the marriage records of this most important early West Virginia county. Up to 1863, the marriages are part of Virginia's records, and after that date they fall within the purview of West Virginia public record. A full and complete index of all names is provided in volume 3 of the set; volume one includes a surname frequency and the complete abstracts sorted alphabetical by husband's name; volume 2 uses the bride's maiden name as the sort key. In this way, many family relationships can easily be seen which would not be visible while scattered throughout the data. This is a most important work for this early county's records.
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[Grn4] {3v.set} $56.95


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 5: Greenbrier County, [W.] Virginia, Deeds & Wills; Early miscellaneous deeds, 1750-52, 1754, 1769, 1783-84; Deed Books 1-5, 1780-1814; Will Book 1, 1777-1833 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 1992, iv, 362 pages. This book is a thorough and comprehensive listing and abstracting of data from the earliest extant deed and will records of this important central West Virginia county. A full and complete name index is provided.
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[Grn5] $29.50


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 6: Greenbrier County, [W.] Virginia, Death Records, 1853-1900 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 1993, iv, 399 pages. This sixth volume in the series by Shuck furnishes a thorough and comprehensive listing and abstracting of all the data from the death registers of this most important central West Virginia county. A full and complete name index is provided.
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[Grn6] $29.50


GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 7: Greenbrier County, [W.] Virginia, Land Entry Book, 1780-1786 transcribed by Helen S. Stinson. 1994, xxii, 297 pages. Originally published in 1984, this new edition has been retypeset, and a full name index provided to aid researchers. The first land record book for Greenbrier covers not only the current county area, but "Greater Greenbrier as it was originally created, a county encompassing nearly all of central West Virginia and extending to the Ohio River. In this first book are found hundreds of preemption grants given to settlers who occupied lands in the region prior to the county's creation, and a wealth of information can be gleaned about the very earliest settlers of the county and region from this volume.
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GREENBRIER COUNTY RECORDS, Volume 8: Birth Records of Greenbrier County, [W.] Virginia, 1853-1898 transcribed by Larry Shuck. 2 volumes, 1995, iv, 614 pages. The birth records are extracted from two nineteenth century registers; The second register includes not only name, sex, race, date of death, and parents of the deceased (as does the other register, but also notes the age of each parent and the number of children born to them. A valuable addition to the growing collection of Greenbrier records. Includes more than 17,000 entries from circa 2,200 families.

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[Grn8] {2v.set} $41.95


Greenbrier Co. 1815 Directory of Landowners by Roger G. Ward. 2005. 46 pages, map, 5 1/2X8 1/2.
For a full description of the 1815 LAND DIRECTORY Records and a listing of available counties, see: Individual County Booklets, 1815 Directory of Virginia Landowners

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[Vd34] $10.00

Greenbrier Co. Revolutionary Public Claims transcribed by Janice L. Abercrombie and Richard Slatten.. 2005. 27 pages, 5 1/2X8 1/2.
For a full description of the Virginia Revolutionary Public Claims and a listing of available counties, see: Revolutionary "Publick" Claims series

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For more records pertaining to GREENBRIER COUNTY VIRGINIA see also:


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